EP 81 Australian Shiraz wine tasting. A serious one.

Little Penguin Shiraz

Amaroo Shiraz

Teal Lake Shiraz

2003 Jacobs Creek Reserve Shiraz

2003 Peter Lehmann Shiraz

2004 Two Hands Bad Impersonator Shiraz

2004 Massena 11th Hour Shiraz

2003 Langmeil Freedom Shiraz

Today Gary tackles it hard, he tastes 8 different Australian Shiraz wines and talks about the wine world and many other fun topics. Watch as Gary tackles wine cellars, wine storage, heat affects on wine, wine racks, wine gift baskets, wine clubs, wine making, wine glasses, wine bars, wine refrigerators, strawberry wine, and other wine topics….oh wait no he’s just doing Shiraz.

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Alexandre Savoie

Not a big Australia Shiraz kinda guy, plus it seems thier good stuff is now pretty expensive, sort of a similar to the cali Cab market. I much prefer french Syrah, although that’s even more expensive. Love the pepper notes you can get from Syrah when its not too over the top.

Tags: Australian, red wines, review, shiraz, Video, wine, wines

Episodes >


  • Chris

    Enjoyed the episode. I’ve been a big fan of Langmeil for about three years now. I adore the Jackman Cabernet. I would love to see a tasting of the 20 rows Grappler. How about a Washington State episode.

  • Chris

    Enjoyed the episode. I’ve been a big fan of Langmeil for about three years now. I adore the Jackman Cabernet. I would love to see a tasting of the 20 rows Grappler. How about a Washington State episode.

  • Chris S

    Gary, These questions are for the “The Chuk’s Greatest Hits” spreadsheet…

    Could you provide your scores for both the Massena and Langmeil.

    Also, you commented that the Langmeil “was more like a $200 Cote Rotite”, I know I’ve butchered the spelling of Cote rotite…..could you help this ignorant boy?

    Also is “cassis” the correct spelling? Sorry

    AWESOME episode….thanks very much for this great service….I’m addicted….as if you can’t tell by the overly-anal Spreadsheet.

    Not only will it help people to remember certain wines from the episodes, but everyone will be able to compare your comments/impressions when they are drinking the wine. This is great for people like me who are trying to learn all of the aromas/flavors. thanks, again.

    P.S. Someone recommended not mentioning your name in the beginning (when you asked for suggestions for the sign-off)….I’m so glad you didn’t take that advice. I really look forward to see the different intensity you have when you say, “I’m your host…Gary Vayner CHUK”. Sometimes you are subdued and other times you are revved up….it’s a good indication of your mood. It reminds of the MAD DOG’s sign in when he says, “Aaaaaaaannnnnnd….good afternoon…..How are you todaaaaaayyyy”. I’m assuming you listen to “Mike and the Mad Dog” and are completely in synch with my point. Anyway,

  • Chris S

    Gary, These questions are for the “The Chuk’s Greatest Hits” spreadsheet…

    Could you provide your scores for both the Massena and Langmeil.

    Also, you commented that the Langmeil “was more like a $200 Cote Rotite”, I know I’ve butchered the spelling of Cote rotite…..could you help this ignorant boy?

    Also is “cassis” the correct spelling? Sorry

    AWESOME episode….thanks very much for this great service….I’m addicted….as if you can’t tell by the overly-anal Spreadsheet.

    Not only will it help people to remember certain wines from the episodes, but everyone will be able to compare your comments/impressions when they are drinking the wine. This is great for people like me who are trying to learn all of the aromas/flavors. thanks, again.

    P.S. Someone recommended not mentioning your name in the beginning (when you asked for suggestions for the sign-off)….I’m so glad you didn’t take that advice. I really look forward to see the different intensity you have when you say, “I’m your host…Gary Vayner CHUK”. Sometimes you are subdued and other times you are revved up….it’s a good indication of your mood. It reminds of the MAD DOG’s sign in when he says, “Aaaaaaaannnnnnd….good afternoon…..How are you todaaaaaayyyy”. I’m assuming you listen to “Mike and the Mad Dog” and are completely in synch with my point. Anyway,

  • TimF

    Chris S: Do you think there is a big overlap of WLTV viewers and Mike and the Mad Dog listeners? I’ve listened to that show since it started. I used to listen to Chris when he filled in for various people too. One of my funniest memories was draft day — must have been 1989. I was driving back from a Mets game with my brother listening to him. The Jets took Jeff Lageman with their first pick. Mad Dog started going off (as usual). He kept saying, “Who the hell is Jeff Lageman?!?”. Over and over for about half an hour. I can still get a laugh out of my brother whenever I bust out that line.

  • TimF

    Chris S: Do you think there is a big overlap of WLTV viewers and Mike and the Mad Dog listeners? I’ve listened to that show since it started. I used to listen to Chris when he filled in for various people too. One of my funniest memories was draft day — must have been 1989. I was driving back from a Mets game with my brother listening to him. The Jets took Jeff Lageman with their first pick. Mad Dog started going off (as usual). He kept saying, “Who the hell is Jeff Lageman?!?”. Over and over for about half an hour. I can still get a laugh out of my brother whenever I bust out that line.

  • DaBear

    Gary,

    I am glad that you have picked one of my questions to you to become the “question of the day”.

    As for the current “question of the day” I would enjoy your views on the Barocco Primitivo, I believe a primitivo grape is an southern Italian Zin, am I correct? When you think of Italian red’s, you do not think of Zin’s. Do you think this is a underapreciated/undermarketed category or past it’s prime?

  • DaBear

    Gary,

    I am glad that you have picked one of my questions to you to become the “question of the day”.

    As for the current “question of the day” I would enjoy your views on the Barocco Primitivo, I believe a primitivo grape is an southern Italian Zin, am I correct? When you think of Italian red’s, you do not think of Zin’s. Do you think this is a underapreciated/undermarketed category or past it’s prime?

  • GOL

    Gary, WLTV continues to evolve like a great wine! Keep up the good work

    QOD: Another vote for the Pillar Box Red. I just tried the ’05 and found it not as good as ’04, which to me was a great wine in the under $10 category. Note to Craig #74, not sure Pillar vs. Penguin or JC is the right under $10 comp as Pillar ’04 was 57% cabernet… interestingly ’05 Pillar doesn’t have varietal info on bottle.

    QOD #2: I support the many emails who suggested tasting a 100 pt wine… since I’ve never had one the next best thing would be to watch Gary have one!

    Gary — Look for my email on Nov 20, when I’m sure you’ll also be getting one from Tony S and TimF… Da Bears 76, Jets 3!

  • GOL

    Gary, WLTV continues to evolve like a great wine! Keep up the good work

    QOD: Another vote for the Pillar Box Red. I just tried the ’05 and found it not as good as ’04, which to me was a great wine in the under $10 category. Note to Craig #74, not sure Pillar vs. Penguin or JC is the right under $10 comp as Pillar ’04 was 57% cabernet… interestingly ’05 Pillar doesn’t have varietal info on bottle.

    QOD #2: I support the many emails who suggested tasting a 100 pt wine… since I’ve never had one the next best thing would be to watch Gary have one!

    Gary — Look for my email on Nov 20, when I’m sure you’ll also be getting one from Tony S and TimF… Da Bears 76, Jets 3!

  • Rob P

    Gary, I’m in Key West Florida and our team here is the Dolphins which of course WILL spank the Jets this year so I’ll be looking forward to free shipping twice this year.
    Question on the Little Penguin and Amaroo. I just read an interesting article on “manufactured” wines in Australia. Would you consider these a manufactured wine or a more traditional wine that changes each vintage?
    Thanks.

  • Rob P

    Gary, I’m in Key West Florida and our team here is the Dolphins which of course WILL spank the Jets this year so I’ll be looking forward to free shipping twice this year.
    Question on the Little Penguin and Amaroo. I just read an interesting article on “manufactured” wines in Australia. Would you consider these a manufactured wine or a more traditional wine that changes each vintage?
    Thanks.

  • DougG

    Interseting. Question. The wine that was corked was that screwtop? It kind of looked like it from the video but not completly sure.

  • DougG

    Interseting. Question. The wine that was corked was that screwtop? It kind of looked like it from the video but not completly sure.

  • Gerard

    G,

    Love watching WLTV. Wife and kids think I’m nuts, but to bad. Corked wine… Not sure I’ve had it but a have come across some of my regular wines that were just absolutely horribly different, assumed the were corked, dumped the bottle. So what should I do with a bad bottle. Most times I just let it go. On one occasion I returned it to WL, about $30 bottle. Another occasion I returned 2 twenty dollar bottles to same store(not WL) both half full, they gave me a hassle in the store then finally after long discussion replaced the wine. What is proper protocol in returning wine? How much wine should be left in the bottle? And who pays , you or distributor. Please advise.
    Lets go Jets. Hoping for 8-8 season.

    G-ROD

  • Gerard

    G,

    Love watching WLTV. Wife and kids think I’m nuts, but to bad. Corked wine… Not sure I’ve had it but a have come across some of my regular wines that were just absolutely horribly different, assumed the were corked, dumped the bottle. So what should I do with a bad bottle. Most times I just let it go. On one occasion I returned it to WL, about $30 bottle. Another occasion I returned 2 twenty dollar bottles to same store(not WL) both half full, they gave me a hassle in the store then finally after long discussion replaced the wine. What is proper protocol in returning wine? How much wine should be left in the bottle? And who pays , you or distributor. Please advise.
    Lets go Jets. Hoping for 8-8 season.

    G-ROD

  • garybee

    It is surprising at times that wines like the Little Penguin ends up being a good “every day” wine. I’ll have to check the Amaroo.
    Gary Beesley

  • garybee

    It is surprising at times that wines like the Little Penguin ends up being a good “every day” wine. I’ll have to check the Amaroo.
    Gary Beesley

  • Matthew

    Hey Gary, my first time to your site. Fantastic. I’m an Aussie living just outside the Barossa Valley. I am a big fan of Langmeil and found your site while trying to get some idea of how their ’97 magnums of Freedom were drinking as I have a couple. I’d also like to take this opportunity to comment to Mitch regarding his post on the 29th August re big wines being put out for the export trade. Essentially, this is correct to a point. And from my understanding that’s doing well in the states. Does it matter if wine is made to a style that is liked for a partiucular market but not necessarily the same as what is preferred in its home country? This aside, let me assure you that the Langmeil Freedom Shiraz vines only produce enough fruit to make about 1 – 1.5 bottles (750ml) per vine of this fantastic single vineyard wine. Believe me, if you don’t want them over there in the States then we’d love to keep them here. The Freedom only ever lasts a few months here on the domestic front and having been awarded best red in the Barossa (beating some fierce Barossan competition) its true testiment to the wines and the team that makes them.

  • Matthew

    Hey Gary, my first time to your site. Fantastic. I’m an Aussie living just outside the Barossa Valley. I am a big fan of Langmeil and found your site while trying to get some idea of how their ’97 magnums of Freedom were drinking as I have a couple. I’d also like to take this opportunity to comment to Mitch regarding his post on the 29th August re big wines being put out for the export trade. Essentially, this is correct to a point. And from my understanding that’s doing well in the states. Does it matter if wine is made to a style that is liked for a partiucular market but not necessarily the same as what is preferred in its home country? This aside, let me assure you that the Langmeil Freedom Shiraz vines only produce enough fruit to make about 1 – 1.5 bottles (750ml) per vine of this fantastic single vineyard wine. Believe me, if you don’t want them over there in the States then we’d love to keep them here. The Freedom only ever lasts a few months here on the domestic front and having been awarded best red in the Barossa (beating some fierce Barossan competition) its true testiment to the wines and the team that makes them.

  • Matthew

    Hello Gary. Another great episode. I just was discussing the nuances of Shiraz to my stepfather the other night while vacationing in Michigan (Go LIONS!) One of the primary I tried to stress with him is that the price of the bottle is not always an indicator of the quality of the wine within. This episode really drove that point home. I admit that I turned my nose up at Little Penguin. I am going to buy a bottle today to see how it compares to other lower-priced Shiraz such as Buckley’s or Four Emus.

    I would be interested in your opinion of Mas De Guiot Cabernet/Syrah or Mas de Guiot Grenache/Syrah

  • Matthew

    Hello Gary. Another great episode. I just was discussing the nuances of Shiraz to my stepfather the other night while vacationing in Michigan (Go LIONS!) One of the primary I tried to stress with him is that the price of the bottle is not always an indicator of the quality of the wine within. This episode really drove that point home. I admit that I turned my nose up at Little Penguin. I am going to buy a bottle today to see how it compares to other lower-priced Shiraz such as Buckley’s or Four Emus.

    I would be interested in your opinion of Mas De Guiot Cabernet/Syrah or Mas de Guiot Grenache/Syrah

  • Rick

    Gary

    http://www.jacobscreek.com/apps/uploadedFiles/VideoTasting/14//Reserve_Shiraz_56k.mov

    Total number of awards: 126

    2003 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator – Sips and Tips â?? 21 June 2006
    91

    Thick, with a layer of black pepper over a mouth filling gob of black cherry and liquorice that cries out for grilled red meat. Drinkable now, better with some age. Best from 2008 through 2013. 61,000 cases imported. From Australia.
    Wine Spectatorâ??s editors have selected this wine as the best buy of the week

    2003 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? Aug.31, 2006
    Great Value 91

    Full of cherry and licorice notes that will tame grilled meat. Its combination of quality, price and availability gain it a Smart buy. Thick, with a layer of black pepper over a mouth filling gob of black cherry and licorice that cries out for grilled meat. Drinkable now, better with some age. Best from 2008 through 2013.

    2003 Shiraz
    WINESTATE September/October 2006
    3.5 stars

    Charred, smoky bacon nose and a big, oaky palate with some attractive varietal fruit underneath and drying tannins on the finish. $15.99

    2002 Shiraz
    More International Success for Jacob’s Creek
    Gold

    Jacobâ??s Creek wines have won major awards in two international wines shows.

    The shows were the Concours Mondial de Bruxelles and the Pacific Rim International Wine Show in the US. Results for both shows have been announced this week.

    The Belgium competition, which is recognised by the European Union, was judged for the 12th time in Ostend between March 31 and April 2.

    Jacobâ??s Creek 1997 Centenary Hill Shiraz was awarded a Great Gold medal, which under the rules of the competition means it scored equal or greater than 96 points from judges. It was the only Australian wine to achieve such recognition.

    As one of the largest and most respected wine competitions in western USA, the Pacific Rim International Wine Competition receives entries from around the world.

    The Pacific Rim International Wine Competition has grown from about 100 entries in 1985 to more than 2200 entries in 2005 and 2006 will mark 21 years of the competition.

    Pacific Rim Competition – USA

    2002 Jacobâ??s Creek Reserve Shiraz – Gold (Best in Class)
    2003 Jacobâ??s Creek Shiraz – Gold
    1997 Jacobâ??s Creek Centenary Hill Shiraz – Gold
    2004 Jacobâ??s Creek Shiraz Rosé – Gold

    Chief Winemaker for Jacobâ??s Creek, Philip Laffer, said the international wins were testament to the philosophy of the brand, which is to improve quality with every vintage.

    Jacobâ??s Creek wines have won more than 2,250 national and international wine show medals and trophies.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? July 2005
    89

    Lovely, focused blueberry and vanilla flavours sing the main melody. Framework is supple and velvety, letting the flavours persist on the well-formed, graceful finish. Drink now through 2012.

    2002 Shiraz
    Winestate â?? July/August 2005
    4½ stars

    A bright and vibrant wine with a nose that is big and lifted with lovely aromas of blackcurrants. Palate exhibits blackcurrant flavours with nice tarry/licorice complexity. Palate is soft, sweet and rich. $15.99

    2002 Shiraz
    Editorial in July/August 2005 Winestate Magazine
    Peter Simic â?? Editor/Publisher

    Shiraz is the flagship of the Australian wine industry and each year we delight in putting together the biggest tasting of Shiraz wines anywhere in the world. It shows the extraordinary reach of the varietal, which has travelled from the Rhone Valley in France to be adopted and made the signature wine of Australia. In this country it has achieved great heights, both as a dependable quaffer at lower price points and at the premium end, where its power continues to amaze.
    While I donâ??t normally draw attention to an individual wine, I have to give an honourable mention to the Jacobâ??s Creek Reserve Shiraz 2002, which can be found in the marketplace for around the $15 mark. This is the yardstick that other makers need to meet. Even if it were twice the price, this is what we are looking for! An extraordinary wine that over delivers.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine and Spirits – October 2005
    86

    Round and supple, this show relatively moderate ripeness, which means black fig and green peppercorn flavours that keep it fresh. A good, firm red for anything off the grill.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator – October 2005
    89

    Focused blueberry and vanilla flavours sing the main melody. Framework is supple as the flavours persist on the graceful finish.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator Dec.31, 2005 â?? Jan.15, 2006
    89

    Smart Buys – RED

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? Dec.31 â?? Jan.15 2006
    89

    Smart Buys

    US$13

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator (H. Steiman)
    89

    â??Lovely, focused blueberry & vanilla flavors sing the main melody. Framework is supple & velvety, letting the flavors persist on the well-formed, graceful finish. Drink now through 2012.â?

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine & Spirits (J. Greene)
    86

    â??â?¦A good, firm red for anything off the grill.â?

    2001 Shiraz
    Golf Asia

    A full bodied wine style, showing concentrated spicy plum and dark chocolate fruits, it is finely balanced with supportive cedar and vanillin oak flavours. Fruit and oak tannins are further harmonised to provide a velvety soft and persistent tannin finish, a typical feature of the Jacob’s Creek red wine

    2001 Shiraz
    Winestate Annual 2005
    $10-$15

    A rich, dense wine â?? all spices and Christmas cake. Nose has charry oak over sweet fruit. Powerful tannic palate, lots of plums and some residual sugar sweetness. Long, lingering and complex.

    2000 Shiraz
    Winestate, July/Aug 2002
    4 Stars

    Bold chary oaky nose, nice plum and blueberries underneath. Generous and firm palate has balance and persistence.

    2000 Shiraz
    OUT OF THE RACK

    Reserve range offers outstanding value
    There are now three ranges of the Jacobâ??s Creek wines: the “core range”, which includes the two wines reviewed here, plus a number of other varietal wines, the Reserve range at this sort of price point and the Limited Reserve range which are in the $40-$60 price point.

    It is the Reserve wines, including the shiraz and the cabernet sauvignon, which I also believe represent outstanding value. They are the sort of wines youâ??d serve to your prospective father-in-law when you were asking for his daughterâ??s hand in marriage. He needs, after all, to know she is going to marry a man of good taste (or the other way around).

    The wine has considerable richness of fruit, a full crimson colour in the glass, lots of pepper on the nose and nice harmony of fruit, tannins, alcohol (13 per cent) and subtle oak influence. In all, a very well put together wine at a reasonable price.

    Orlando Jacobâ??s Creek 2000 Reserve Shiraz $14

    2000 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? July 2005

    “Moderate”
    Jacob’s Creek 2000 Reserve Shiraz
    South Eastern Australia

    Medium-plus tannins and acidity with raspberry, blackberry, vanilla, mint,
    and black pepper; medium finish Venison. Smart Buy. Serve now, but will
    hold for some time.

    1999 Shiraz
    Wine Enthusiast, September 2002

    87 Jacob’s Creek 1999 Reserve Shiraz (South Australia) $18 Combines effusively rich, blueberry liqueur aromas with vanilla, yet still comes across as a little tight, with the promise of better things to come. That’s confirmed by the layers of ripe chewy tannins on the finish. Goes down easy now; should be better in a couple of years.

    1999 Shiraz
    Divine, May/July 2002

    Jacob’s Creek Reserve Shiraz 1999 $15
    The Jacob’s Creek Reserve range, and particularly the Shiraz, have received many accolades since they were first released last year, and with very good reason. I’m sure smaller winemakers must look enviously at the ability of big companies such as Orlando Wyndham to source grapes from far and wide and come up with a wine many would be proud to sell for nearly double the price.
    I tried this on a very cool day – we’ve had lots in Melbourne this past summer – as it is real winter wine: ripe plum and raspberries supported by subtle smoky, vanilin oak flavours of great length and persistence that are as comforting as tucking into a bowl of hearty soup by an open fire. But given its restorative and invigorating qualities, I’d recommend grabbing a bottle whatever the weather.

    1999 Shiraz
    Uncorked, May 2002
    5 Stars

    Extraordinary value!
    It has fruitcake, gamy, smoky, toasty aromas and a soft, easy drinking palate with generous savoury flavours. The intensity and palate length are remarkable in a wine of its price.
    Food: Meatballs in tomato sauce.
    Ageing: Drink now and for five or six years.

    1999 Shiraz
    Sun Herald Sunday Life

    This slightly up-market version of Orlando’s international bestseller is a great bargain in anybody’s language. With a core of liqueurish, blackberry-like shriraz fruit, and touches of sweet spice and coconutty oak, it’s a mouth-filling drink.

    1999 Shiraz
    Halliday’s Top 100, Winepros website
    89

    Good colour and a bouquet flooded with ripe, dark plum and prune leads logically into a palate with luscious ripe fruit offset by appropriately persistent tannins and subtle oak.

    1999 Shiraz
    Jeremy Oliver’s On Wine Report Update, October 2001 Vol 4 Issue 9

    Those who like modern shiraz will find excellent value for money in this fullish, generous sort of a red, whose ripe raspberry, plum and blackcurrant fruit is well matched with sweet vanilla and toasty oak. It’s not overblown, does have a good length of bright, ripe flavour and does finish with well-integrated smooth tannins and acids. Drink 2001-2004+

    1998 Shiraz
    Wine Enthusiast 2001

    The blackberry, vanilla and toasty oak elements are nicely balanced on the nose and in the mouth. Deep fruit shines, and the supple mouthfeel is very appealing.

    Finishes long, with a compelling back-end bouquet that completes the package in fine style.

    1998 Shiraz
    Wine and Spirits, February 2001

    This ’98 is filled with plush, ripe shiraz flavors. All the black fruit rolls around on the tongue, voluptuous and bold. It’s inherently simple, yet deliciously rich. Open a bottle with steak au poivre.
    (4,000 cases)

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  • Rick

    Gary

    http://www.jacobscreek.com/apps/uploadedFiles/VideoTasting/14//Reserve_Shiraz_56k.mov

    Total number of awards: 126

    2003 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator – Sips and Tips â?? 21 June 2006
    91

    Thick, with a layer of black pepper over a mouth filling gob of black cherry and liquorice that cries out for grilled red meat. Drinkable now, better with some age. Best from 2008 through 2013. 61,000 cases imported. From Australia.
    Wine Spectatorâ??s editors have selected this wine as the best buy of the week

    2003 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? Aug.31, 2006
    Great Value 91

    Full of cherry and licorice notes that will tame grilled meat. Its combination of quality, price and availability gain it a Smart buy. Thick, with a layer of black pepper over a mouth filling gob of black cherry and licorice that cries out for grilled meat. Drinkable now, better with some age. Best from 2008 through 2013.

    2003 Shiraz
    WINESTATE September/October 2006
    3.5 stars

    Charred, smoky bacon nose and a big, oaky palate with some attractive varietal fruit underneath and drying tannins on the finish. $15.99

    2002 Shiraz
    More International Success for Jacob’s Creek
    Gold

    Jacobâ??s Creek wines have won major awards in two international wines shows.

    The shows were the Concours Mondial de Bruxelles and the Pacific Rim International Wine Show in the US. Results for both shows have been announced this week.

    The Belgium competition, which is recognised by the European Union, was judged for the 12th time in Ostend between March 31 and April 2.

    Jacobâ??s Creek 1997 Centenary Hill Shiraz was awarded a Great Gold medal, which under the rules of the competition means it scored equal or greater than 96 points from judges. It was the only Australian wine to achieve such recognition.

    As one of the largest and most respected wine competitions in western USA, the Pacific Rim International Wine Competition receives entries from around the world.

    The Pacific Rim International Wine Competition has grown from about 100 entries in 1985 to more than 2200 entries in 2005 and 2006 will mark 21 years of the competition.

    Pacific Rim Competition – USA

    2002 Jacobâ??s Creek Reserve Shiraz – Gold (Best in Class)
    2003 Jacobâ??s Creek Shiraz – Gold
    1997 Jacobâ??s Creek Centenary Hill Shiraz – Gold
    2004 Jacobâ??s Creek Shiraz Rosé – Gold

    Chief Winemaker for Jacobâ??s Creek, Philip Laffer, said the international wins were testament to the philosophy of the brand, which is to improve quality with every vintage.

    Jacobâ??s Creek wines have won more than 2,250 national and international wine show medals and trophies.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? July 2005
    89

    Lovely, focused blueberry and vanilla flavours sing the main melody. Framework is supple and velvety, letting the flavours persist on the well-formed, graceful finish. Drink now through 2012.

    2002 Shiraz
    Winestate â?? July/August 2005
    4½ stars

    A bright and vibrant wine with a nose that is big and lifted with lovely aromas of blackcurrants. Palate exhibits blackcurrant flavours with nice tarry/licorice complexity. Palate is soft, sweet and rich. $15.99

    2002 Shiraz
    Editorial in July/August 2005 Winestate Magazine
    Peter Simic â?? Editor/Publisher

    Shiraz is the flagship of the Australian wine industry and each year we delight in putting together the biggest tasting of Shiraz wines anywhere in the world. It shows the extraordinary reach of the varietal, which has travelled from the Rhone Valley in France to be adopted and made the signature wine of Australia. In this country it has achieved great heights, both as a dependable quaffer at lower price points and at the premium end, where its power continues to amaze.
    While I donâ??t normally draw attention to an individual wine, I have to give an honourable mention to the Jacobâ??s Creek Reserve Shiraz 2002, which can be found in the marketplace for around the $15 mark. This is the yardstick that other makers need to meet. Even if it were twice the price, this is what we are looking for! An extraordinary wine that over delivers.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine and Spirits – October 2005
    86

    Round and supple, this show relatively moderate ripeness, which means black fig and green peppercorn flavours that keep it fresh. A good, firm red for anything off the grill.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator – October 2005
    89

    Focused blueberry and vanilla flavours sing the main melody. Framework is supple as the flavours persist on the graceful finish.

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator Dec.31, 2005 â?? Jan.15, 2006
    89

    Smart Buys – RED

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? Dec.31 â?? Jan.15 2006
    89

    Smart Buys

    US$13

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator (H. Steiman)
    89

    â??Lovely, focused blueberry & vanilla flavors sing the main melody. Framework is supple & velvety, letting the flavors persist on the well-formed, graceful finish. Drink now through 2012.â?

    2002 Shiraz
    Wine & Spirits (J. Greene)
    86

    â??â?¦A good, firm red for anything off the grill.â?

    2001 Shiraz
    Golf Asia

    A full bodied wine style, showing concentrated spicy plum and dark chocolate fruits, it is finely balanced with supportive cedar and vanillin oak flavours. Fruit and oak tannins are further harmonised to provide a velvety soft and persistent tannin finish, a typical feature of the Jacob’s Creek red wine

    2001 Shiraz
    Winestate Annual 2005
    $10-$15

    A rich, dense wine â?? all spices and Christmas cake. Nose has charry oak over sweet fruit. Powerful tannic palate, lots of plums and some residual sugar sweetness. Long, lingering and complex.

    2000 Shiraz
    Winestate, July/Aug 2002
    4 Stars

    Bold chary oaky nose, nice plum and blueberries underneath. Generous and firm palate has balance and persistence.

    2000 Shiraz
    OUT OF THE RACK

    Reserve range offers outstanding value
    There are now three ranges of the Jacobâ??s Creek wines: the “core range”, which includes the two wines reviewed here, plus a number of other varietal wines, the Reserve range at this sort of price point and the Limited Reserve range which are in the $40-$60 price point.

    It is the Reserve wines, including the shiraz and the cabernet sauvignon, which I also believe represent outstanding value. They are the sort of wines youâ??d serve to your prospective father-in-law when you were asking for his daughterâ??s hand in marriage. He needs, after all, to know she is going to marry a man of good taste (or the other way around).

    The wine has considerable richness of fruit, a full crimson colour in the glass, lots of pepper on the nose and nice harmony of fruit, tannins, alcohol (13 per cent) and subtle oak influence. In all, a very well put together wine at a reasonable price.

    Orlando Jacobâ??s Creek 2000 Reserve Shiraz $14

    2000 Shiraz
    Wine Spectator â?? July 2005

    “Moderate”
    Jacob’s Creek 2000 Reserve Shiraz
    South Eastern Australia

    Medium-plus tannins and acidity with raspberry, blackberry, vanilla, mint,
    and black pepper; medium finish Venison. Smart Buy. Serve now, but will
    hold for some time.

    1999 Shiraz
    Wine Enthusiast, September 2002

    87 Jacob’s Creek 1999 Reserve Shiraz (South Australia) $18 Combines effusively rich, blueberry liqueur aromas with vanilla, yet still comes across as a little tight, with the promise of better things to come. That’s confirmed by the layers of ripe chewy tannins on the finish. Goes down easy now; should be better in a couple of years.

    1999 Shiraz
    Divine, May/July 2002

    Jacob’s Creek Reserve Shiraz 1999 $15
    The Jacob’s Creek Reserve range, and particularly the Shiraz, have received many accolades since they were first released last year, and with very good reason. I’m sure smaller winemakers must look enviously at the ability of big companies such as Orlando Wyndham to source grapes from far and wide and come up with a wine many would be proud to sell for nearly double the price.
    I tried this on a very cool day – we’ve had lots in Melbourne this past summer – as it is real winter wine: ripe plum and raspberries supported by subtle smoky, vanilin oak flavours of great length and persistence that are as comforting as tucking into a bowl of hearty soup by an open fire. But given its restorative and invigorating qualities, I’d recommend grabbing a bottle whatever the weather.

    1999 Shiraz
    Uncorked, May 2002
    5 Stars

    Extraordinary value!
    It has fruitcake, gamy, smoky, toasty aromas and a soft, easy drinking palate with generous savoury flavours. The intensity and palate length are remarkable in a wine of its price.
    Food: Meatballs in tomato sauce.
    Ageing: Drink now and for five or six years.

    1999 Shiraz
    Sun Herald Sunday Life

    This slightly up-market version of Orlando’s international bestseller is a great bargain in anybody’s language. With a core of liqueurish, blackberry-like shriraz fruit, and touches of sweet spice and coconutty oak, it’s a mouth-filling drink.

    1999 Shiraz
    Halliday’s Top 100, Winepros website
    89

    Good colour and a bouquet flooded with ripe, dark plum and prune leads logically into a palate with luscious ripe fruit offset by appropriately persistent tannins and subtle oak.

    1999 Shiraz
    Jeremy Oliver’s On Wine Report Update, October 2001 Vol 4 Issue 9

    Those who like modern shiraz will find excellent value for money in this fullish, generous sort of a red, whose ripe raspberry, plum and blackcurrant fruit is well matched with sweet vanilla and toasty oak. It’s not overblown, does have a good length of bright, ripe flavour and does finish with well-integrated smooth tannins and acids. Drink 2001-2004+

    1998 Shiraz
    Wine Enthusiast 2001

    The blackberry, vanilla and toasty oak elements are nicely balanced on the nose and in the mouth. Deep fruit shines, and the supple mouthfeel is very appealing.

    Finishes long, with a compelling back-end bouquet that completes the package in fine style.

    1998 Shiraz
    Wine and Spirits, February 2001

    This ’98 is filled with plush, ripe shiraz flavors. All the black fruit rolls around on the tongue, voluptuous and bold. It’s inherently simple, yet deliciously rich. Open a bottle with steak au poivre.
    (4,000 cases)

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  • Rick
  • Rick
  • Claudio

    Gary –

    I thought the Journal or other publication recently came out and stated that Shiraz did not come from Iran and that it was a myth.

    Let me know if you want me to forward the article to you.

    Claudio
    Chicago, IL

  • Claudio

    Gary –

    I thought the Journal or other publication recently came out and stated that Shiraz did not come from Iran and that it was a myth.

    Let me know if you want me to forward the article to you.

    Claudio
    Chicago, IL

  • Dave Canada

    I used to be so hyped on these wines but am now looking to get rid of my Dead Arms, LAngmeil etc……should I hold onto them, assuming that I may come back to them in the future? Can you change from a new world to old world and then back?

  • Dave Canada

    I used to be so hyped on these wines but am now looking to get rid of my Dead Arms, LAngmeil etc……should I hold onto them, assuming that I may come back to them in the future? Can you change from a new world to old world and then back?

  • thefanjestic

    Sweet Shiraz – “If I have to die – I hope I’m killed by a Fruit Bomb!”
    -The Fanjestic

  • thefanjestic

    Sweet Shiraz – “If I have to die – I hope I’m killed by a Fruit Bomb!”
    -The Fanjestic

  • Kristen

    That was interesting that the Little Penguin showed so well. I’ll have to try it out.

    QOTD: I’d love to see you try Georgian wines, in particular, the Mukuzani Dry Red (WL #:7238). At $8, it would be cool to see how it shows. I’ve been interested in trying Georgian wines to expand my palate, but they aren’t the easiest to find.

  • Kristen

    That was interesting that the Little Penguin showed so well. I’ll have to try it out.

    QOTD: I’d love to see you try Georgian wines, in particular, the Mukuzani Dry Red (WL #:7238). At $8, it would be cool to see how it shows. I’ve been interested in trying Georgian wines to expand my palate, but they aren’t the easiest to find.

  • lawschooldrunk

    I’m watching these out of order but that is the second kosher wine (teal lake) that has been corked on winelibrarytv.com. what’s up with that crap?

  • lawschooldrunk

    I’m watching these out of order but that is the second kosher wine (teal lake) that has been corked on winelibrarytv.com. what’s up with that crap?

  • wayno da wino

    Yo G, Had to watch this one again since i loooove the Aussie Fruit bombs
    from time to time. This is a Grrrreaaaat Episode!!!!

  • wayno da wino

    Yo G, Had to watch this one again since i loooove the Aussie Fruit bombs
    from time to time. This is a Grrrreaaaat Episode!!!!

  • John__J

    qotd: do a tasting on all your charbono’s and throw in a few you dont carry too. Also a vin jaune episode would be killer.

  • John J.

    qotd: do a tasting on all your charbono’s and throw in a few you dont carry too. Also a vin jaune episode would be killer.

  • Steve

    Hi Gary,
    LOOOOOVVVEEE watching you, really enjoy!
    How about this tasting dude!
    Do you know anything about the 2003 Vintage.
    04, 05,06 – awesome.
    Langmeil – $$$$$ – it had better be good!
    Lehmann and Jacobs Creek, apples with apples mate, you looked at them up against wines from the 04 vintage?
    Love your work, keep it up, still love the episode of you showing the effect the weather has on wine tasting! Bahahaha, kills me every time!
    Cheers,
    Steve.

  • Steve

    Hi Gary,
    LOOOOOVVVEEE watching you, really enjoy!
    How about this tasting dude!
    Do you know anything about the 2003 Vintage.
    04, 05,06 – awesome.
    Langmeil – $$$$$ – it had better be good!
    Lehmann and Jacobs Creek, apples with apples mate, you looked at them up against wines from the 04 vintage?
    Love your work, keep it up, still love the episode of you showing the effect the weather has on wine tasting! Bahahaha, kills me every time!
    Cheers,
    Steve.

  • corkscrew

    The corked taste could of affected your taste with the next couple wines you tried, have had the Jacobs Creek, Two Hands, Langmeil, all solid wines for their price level. Little late for QOTD. http://www.winelx.com

  • Nick Laszewski

    I’m pretty close to Green Bay:)

  • Anonymous

    Don’t feel the Shiraz’s from Austrailia! Just too much

    QOTD: well it doesn’t matter any more

  • http://www.discoveryofwine.com Alexandre Savoie

    Not a big Australia Shiraz kinda guy, plus it seems thier good stuff is now pretty expensive, sort of a similar to the cali Cab market. I much prefer french Syrah, although that’s even more expensive. Love the pepper notes you can get from Syrah when its not too over the top.

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