EP 103 93 Point Wines Are They Worth It?

Wines tasted in this episode:

Today Gary attacks three wines with huge scores, 93 points to be exact and tries to see if they are worth the score. Sit back and watch a very interesting episode of Wine Library TV and oh yeah send a link to all your friends!

 
 

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Manuel

Excuse me, but I am from Portugal and there is a BIG difference in the different styles of ports and depending on that is the time how long you can or should drink the Port after opening the bottle.
A usual Ruby or Tawny, Ruby or Ruby or Tawny Reserva as well as 10 years to 40 years Tawnys you can easily drink for 2-3 months after opening without any notable decrease in quality.
BUT: It is completely different with an older vintage port!!!
Vintage Port should be consumed within at least 48 hours after opening. Every Portwine producer and everyone who knows about Port would suggests that!

Tags: Brunello, cabernet, napa, red wines, review, Video, wine, wines

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  • David Canada

    QOTD – Hmmm….had a person I know who is way into wine tell me that he only buys Bordeaux in good years, that he only has 45,61,70,82, 90, 95, 2000 in his cellar and that buying Bordeaux any other time is like flushing your money away…..

  • yathink2

    Hi ya Hawk, I am an otter. I really loved your last few episodes. Still working my way up to get caught up. Keep up the good work and never mind all your business nay sayers. You are providing a great service and I am learning a lot. Thank you

  • yathink2

    Hi ya Hawk, I am an otter. I really loved your last few episodes. Still working my way up to get caught up. Keep up the good work and never mind all your business nay sayers. You are providing a great service and I am learning a lot. Thank you

  • thefanjestic

    Qotd: I’m a liger.

    Qotd 2: The biggest wine snobbery is from myself unfortunately. I had tried this Australian shiraz (whose name escapes me) in the bottle and was blown away at it’s quality for $6 a bottle.

    I then told another friend about it and a few days later he said he went to the liquor store and it was only a box wine. I was pissed, thought he was messing with me and refuted the idea that this wine I had been so impressed with was a box wine.

    Well, it was. My friend and I had a huge laugh about this later on because we were both telling each other we were wrong and getting frustrated with the other person. I then went on to tell the person who had suggested the bottle to me that it was a box wine and the argument began all over again.

    I was ashamed to have enjoyed a boxed wine – I thought I was better than that, but now I know – the best things in life are free! Or at least very very cheap!

  • thefanjestic

    Qotd: I’m a liger.

    Qotd 2: The biggest wine snobbery is from myself unfortunately. I had tried this Australian shiraz (whose name escapes me) in the bottle and was blown away at it’s quality for $6 a bottle.

    I then told another friend about it and a few days later he said he went to the liquor store and it was only a box wine. I was pissed, thought he was messing with me and refuted the idea that this wine I had been so impressed with was a box wine.

    Well, it was. My friend and I had a huge laugh about this later on because we were both telling each other we were wrong and getting frustrated with the other person. I then went on to tell the person who had suggested the bottle to me that it was a box wine and the argument began all over again.

    I was ashamed to have enjoyed a boxed wine – I thought I was better than that, but now I know – the best things in life are free! Or at least very very cheap!

  • manonthemoon

    QOTD: I tend to get a first hand account of “wine snobbery” the first few times I go into most wine shops because I am in my mid 20’s and tend to be a t-shirt and blue jean type of guy, even though I do decently well for my age group. I always tend to get the usual questioning look or they point out the lower level wines that they are trying to push on people. But luckily after talking to most of the people they either realize I have a decent amount of wine knowledge and they engage me in a equal minded approach. And if they continue to talk down I just do not purchase from the store, thats the best way to show displeasure with service.

  • manonthemoon

    QOTD: I tend to get a first hand account of “wine snobbery” the first few times I go into most wine shops because I am in my mid 20’s and tend to be a t-shirt and blue jean type of guy, even though I do decently well for my age group. I always tend to get the usual questioning look or they point out the lower level wines that they are trying to push on people. But luckily after talking to most of the people they either realize I have a decent amount of wine knowledge and they engage me in a equal minded approach. And if they continue to talk down I just do not purchase from the store, thats the best way to show displeasure with service.

  • John__J

    qotd: I totally agree with manonthemoon with his answer. I’m the wine steward in my restaurant, and I’m going to make wine my profession, but I have absolute contempt for wine snobbery.
    Like manonthemoon, I know what it’s like in those liquor stores. I’ll go in on my day off in a t-shirt and jeans, and I’m in my 20’s, and look a little young for my age. So quite often I get all the employees, most over twice my age, staring at me and/or following around the store. Everyone will come up in succession asking if they can help, because they are suspicious of my age or that I might steal since I’m looking at the nice wines. So, only when they behave that way, will I start asking them wine questions they can’t answer. Or questions about wines in their own shop they can’t answer. Or seeing if they can order me a wine, and I’ll tell them what distributor to look for in the beverage journal, and if they quote me a high mark up, I’ll ask why, since I know how much they are buying it for.
    That’s probably the worst snobbery I see and hate.
    The one that sticks out for me as far as me dealing with guests, was a lady I was going to serve wine to about 2 years ago. A real Mrs. Howell type from Gilligan’s Island. She asked for a glass of chardonnay, and I replied I’d be right back with a real nice burgundy. I’m sure you’ve dealt with this one Gary, lol. She says, “No, I want a chardonnay.” I politely try to explain that that IS a chardonnay. She doesn’t want to hear it, tells me I’ve made “an egregious faux pas.”, and gets very frustrated and decides she doesn’t even want any wine at all now.
    My question for you now Gary. I’m looking for something I’ve never seen you do before so, will you do an episode on vin jaune’s? And for something a bit more laid back, can you do a tasting episode on different charbono’s?

  • John J.

    qotd: I totally agree with manonthemoon with his answer. I’m the wine steward in my restaurant, and I’m going to make wine my profession, but I have absolute contempt for wine snobbery.
    Like manonthemoon, I know what it’s like in those liquor stores. I’ll go in on my day off in a t-shirt and jeans, and I’m in my 20’s, and look a little young for my age. So quite often I get all the employees, most over twice my age, staring at me and/or following around the store. Everyone will come up in succession asking if they can help, because they are suspicious of my age or that I might steal since I’m looking at the nice wines. So, only when they behave that way, will I start asking them wine questions they can’t answer. Or questions about wines in their own shop they can’t answer. Or seeing if they can order me a wine, and I’ll tell them what distributor to look for in the beverage journal, and if they quote me a high mark up, I’ll ask why, since I know how much they are buying it for.
    That’s probably the worst snobbery I see and hate.
    The one that sticks out for me as far as me dealing with guests, was a lady I was going to serve wine to about 2 years ago. A real Mrs. Howell type from Gilligan’s Island. She asked for a glass of chardonnay, and I replied I’d be right back with a real nice burgundy. I’m sure you’ve dealt with this one Gary, lol. She says, “No, I want a chardonnay.” I politely try to explain that that IS a chardonnay. She doesn’t want to hear it, tells me I’ve made “an egregious faux pas.”, and gets very frustrated and decides she doesn’t even want any wine at all now.
    My question for you now Gary. I’m looking for something I’ve never seen you do before so, will you do an episode on vin jaune’s? And for something a bit more laid back, can you do a tasting episode on different charbono’s?

  • Lynne

    wow1 never been in top 5 before…

  • corkscrew

    Nice wines. QOTD-Maybe the tour at Opus One..they were quite full of themselves and the wine is highly overrated and overpriced. http://www.winelx.com

  • http://www.discoveryofwine.com Alexandre Savoie aka Sniffysix

    I would have to agree with you about Opus One.

  • Manuel

    Excuse me, but I am from Portugal and there is a BIG difference in the different styles of ports and depending on that is the time how long you can or should drink the Port after opening the bottle.
    A usual Ruby or Tawny, Ruby or Ruby or Tawny Reserva as well as 10 years to 40 years Tawnys you can easily drink for 2-3 months after opening without any notable decrease in quality.
    BUT: It is completely different with an older vintage port!!!
    Vintage Port should be consumed within at least 48 hours after opening. Every Portwine producer and everyone who knows about Port would suggests that!

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