EP 640 Randy Sloan from Match Vineyards Comes by the Thunder Show

Gary Vaynerchuk welcomes Randy from Match and talks about Napa, wine and a few other things.

Wines tasted in this episode:

2006 Match Cabernet Sauvignon Butterdragon Hill
2005 Match Cabernet Sauvignon Butterdragon Hill
2005 Match Baconbrook Cabernet Sauvignon

Links mentioned in today’s episode.

Latest Comment:

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Luca Bercelli

90/100

line of the day – about the Vaynerchuks ‘up to 4th grade we dominate (sports) because of knowledge of the game, but after that it gets hairy because everybody else gets bigger’

Liked the guest despite his annoying voice and the fact that he was unaware of the QOTD tradition (ie he doesn’t watch the show). Gary liked him and that’s good enough for me.

Tags: cabernet, california, guests, red, review, Sauvignon, Video, wine, wines

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  • Zino

    Murso,

    Why do you assume that I know nothing and haven’t tasted the types of wines you mention? I understand the costs, dedication and hard work involved, but that doesn’t necessarily justify high prices.

    Gary’s scores sums it for me: 90pts for a $72 Napa and 93pts for a $24 montepulciano d’ Abruzzo

  • Patrick

    California has a very poor QPR compared to other parts of the world. Naturally, this generates mistrust among consumers. I see no reason why people shouldn’t be suspicious about paying $70 for a bottle.

    QOTD: Not sure if it is a Gary wine, but Gaba Do Xil Godello 2006– $12 !!!

  • Patrick

    California has a very poor QPR compared to other parts of the world. Naturally, this generates mistrust among consumers. I see no reason why people shouldn’t be suspicious about paying $70 for a bottle.

    QOTD: Not sure if it is a Gary wine, but Gaba Do Xil Godello 2006– $12 !!!

  • http://www.eatinghk.blogspot.com/ Andrew D

    Thanks guys,

    Interesting episode.

    QOTD: Interestingly I don’t buy much on Gary’s recommendations. Occasionally something from the Old World he recommends grabs my attention, but I actually find it very difficult to source many of the wines he tastes. Even though Hong Kong (where I live) has a good (and improving) selection of international wines, I find it very interesting that many of the ‘common’ wines Gary tries aren’t available here. Maybe this has something to do with the different packaging required for the US (Surgeon Generals warning…) or maybe it’s a result of different markets = different tastes.

    Cheers
    Andrew

  • http://www.eatinghk.blogspot.com Andrew D

    Thanks guys,

    Interesting episode.

    QOTD: Interestingly I don’t buy much on Gary’s recommendations. Occasionally something from the Old World he recommends grabs my attention, but I actually find it very difficult to source many of the wines he tastes. Even though Hong Kong (where I live) has a good (and improving) selection of international wines, I find it very interesting that many of the ‘common’ wines Gary tries aren’t available here. Maybe this has something to do with the different packaging required for the US (Surgeon Generals warning…) or maybe it’s a result of different markets = different tastes.

    Cheers
    Andrew

  • Jeff

    while I understand the need to watch ones wallet in these times. I can’t understand my fellow wine drinkers who comment about a wine they’ve never tasted. This is an incredibly young, young wine that the winemaker himself stated should not be drunk now. Having tasted Match’s 02 and 03, which are drinking beautifully and very youthful, the 05 and 06 will probably become fantastic wines. Certain wines are meant for every day drinking, some wines are meant to be cellared and popped open on those special occasions. The joy of going into the cellar and opening up a bottle that one has stored for a few years is immensely more enjoyable then stopping by my local wine store and picking up a 10$ bottle.

  • Jeff

    while I understand the need to watch ones wallet in these times. I can’t understand my fellow wine drinkers who comment about a wine they’ve never tasted. This is an incredibly young, young wine that the winemaker himself stated should not be drunk now. Having tasted Match’s 02 and 03, which are drinking beautifully and very youthful, the 05 and 06 will probably become fantastic wines. Certain wines are meant for every day drinking, some wines are meant to be cellared and popped open on those special occasions. The joy of going into the cellar and opening up a bottle that one has stored for a few years is immensely more enjoyable then stopping by my local wine store and picking up a 10$ bottle.

  • Anonymous

    Bravo, Jeff.

    Dear Mr. Zino,

    I am sorry, I did not wish to imply, or state that you, or anyone else didn’t know the value of this, or other wine (but April did ask for an explanation).

    However, after many years in the service of the public in the wine industry, I AM aware that more people than not, ARE NOT aware of such important factors to a wine’s provenance as graft/type, clonal selection, micro-climates, high elevation plots, non-irrigated vines, low- yields, gravity-flow, etc. and on and on. Specifically, in the case of more artisinal wines,and not factory, industrial, or conglomerate size production wines, which may have their own merits of low-cost, ‘consistency’, and wide availability.

    A cursory look at Match’s website revealed more than a general look at their attitudes AND aptitudes. My point about their talent was that you don’t pay for top tier winemaking (and all the rest) unless your raw resources and materials are up to smack. Again – the addage “If you want to make a small fortune in the wine world, start wth a large one!” It would be like Mario Batali using McDonald’s ingredients. Or Helen Turley making a wine blend for Sutter Home. (Don’t get any ideas, Sutter…)

    Over the years I’ve spoken to numerous big names in these upper heights of the wine world, and many said that the phylloxera and Pierce’s Disease problems become a mixed blessing for the knowledges gained by uprooting and replanting with superior rootstocks and clones. Good, viable fruit is often harvested in three or four years of planting.

    And finally, I will repeat – 90points Parker at $10, though tasty, good, and cheap, will NEVER BE IN THE SAME LEAGUE as 90points Parker at, say $50. (arbitrary figures). My whole point is that they are simply not made out of the same (quality)(sic) stuff, whether the same or diff. varietal, country, or even from the same producer.

    I may have taken that pedantic tone, again, and I apoplogize if it was offensive. My intention was to shed light on a subjective subject where I thought it needed.

    I hope we can be friendly again, if you excuse my outburst.

    Thanks, and cheers!

    Murso.

  • Murso

    Bravo, Jeff.

    Dear Mr. Zino,

    I am sorry, I did not wish to imply, or state that you, or anyone else didn’t know the value of this, or other wine (but April did ask for an explanation).

    However, after many years in the service of the public in the wine industry, I AM aware that more people than not, ARE NOT aware of such important factors to a wine’s provenance as graft/type, clonal selection, micro-climates, high elevation plots, non-irrigated vines, low- yields, gravity-flow, etc. and on and on. Specifically, in the case of more artisinal wines,and not factory, industrial, or conglomerate size production wines, which may have their own merits of low-cost, ‘consistency’, and wide availability.

    A cursory look at Match’s website revealed more than a general look at their attitudes AND aptitudes. My point about their talent was that you don’t pay for top tier winemaking (and all the rest) unless your raw resources and materials are up to smack. Again – the addage “If you want to make a small fortune in the wine world, start wth a large one!” It would be like Mario Batali using McDonald’s ingredients. Or Helen Turley making a wine blend for Sutter Home. (Don’t get any ideas, Sutter…)

    Over the years I’ve spoken to numerous big names in these upper heights of the wine world, and many said that the phylloxera and Pierce’s Disease problems become a mixed blessing for the knowledges gained by uprooting and replanting with superior rootstocks and clones. Good, viable fruit is often harvested in three or four years of planting.

    And finally, I will repeat – 90points Parker at $10, though tasty, good, and cheap, will NEVER BE IN THE SAME LEAGUE as 90points Parker at, say $50. (arbitrary figures). My whole point is that they are simply not made out of the same (quality)(sic) stuff, whether the same or diff. varietal, country, or even from the same producer.

    I may have taken that pedantic tone, again, and I apoplogize if it was offensive. My intention was to shed light on a subjective subject where I thought it needed.

    I hope we can be friendly again, if you excuse my outburst.

    Thanks, and cheers!

    Murso.

  • Anonymous

    Still playing catch-up. Informative and fun episode- thanks!

    QOTD: In general, Albarino. I don’t remember Gary’s specific recommendation(s), but it led to us finding Martin Codax Rias Baixas Albarino (2007). Well-liked by friends of all levels of wine knowledge/ experience.

  • Laurie in VT

    Still playing catch-up. Informative and fun episode- thanks!

    QOTD: In general, Albarino. I don’t remember Gary’s specific recommendation(s), but it led to us finding Martin Codax Rias Baixas Albarino (2007). Well-liked by friends of all levels of wine knowledge/ experience.

  • Patrick

    Jeff makes a good point, I haven’t tried this wine and so I have no real opinion on it. But sadly, I will never buy it. There is a whole world of wine out there that is available at half the price of the one discussed here. And I am talking about reasonably priced wine that can be laid down several years and popped for that special occasion, as Jeff mentioned. What incentive do I have to go out and try wines from California when they are so consistently overpriced?

    One of my first misconceptions about good wine was that it was an inherently expensive product. I know now that this isn’t true. Even when the euro was at its strongest, I still found the best values from abroad, say Spain.

    Murso, as a wine consumer I refuse to let all those factors enter into my buying decisions. Why should I? I just want something for my 10th anniversary. Such talk (real estate? elevation? scoring?) is what arouses suspicion. Why not talk about differences in nose, taste, aging potential, etc…the more tangible things about wine.

  • Patrick

    Jeff makes a good point, I haven’t tried this wine and so I have no real opinion on it. But sadly, I will never buy it. There is a whole world of wine out there that is available at half the price of the one discussed here. And I am talking about reasonably priced wine that can be laid down several years and popped for that special occasion, as Jeff mentioned. What incentive do I have to go out and try wines from California when they are so consistently overpriced?

    One of my first misconceptions about good wine was that it was an inherently expensive product. I know now that this isn’t true. Even when the euro was at its strongest, I still found the best values from abroad, say Spain.

    Murso, as a wine consumer I refuse to let all those factors enter into my buying decisions. Why should I? I just want something for my 10th anniversary. Such talk (real estate? elevation? scoring?) is what arouses suspicion. Why not talk about differences in nose, taste, aging potential, etc…the more tangible things about wine.

  • Jeff

    Patrick, Spain has it’s rather pricey producers too. Vega Scilia, Palacios, Pingus to name of a few that sell for far north of 200$ at times.

    I personally, do not drink wine every day, or even every week but I do hit up a few of the tasting circles and I must say, you are missing out on a whole world of wines that could potentially “wow” you.

    I would never advocate to anyone that they should only drink XX$+ bottles, but to say I would never try a wine because it’s over XX$ I feel is just too restrictive.

    You’re right on one thing and that there is indeed a whole world of wine out there, only it’s not all below the 20$ mark =).

    As with your point of discussion with the elevation, acidity, brix what not, it really depends on the wine nerds you’re drinking with =)

    btw, the wine that first “wowed” me was a 100$ 01 Cakebread Vinehill reserve. I was a believer after then, that some wines can indeed be better than just good and I wouldn’t blink at trading in a case of good 10-15$ wine for a single bottle of that.

  • Jeff

    Patrick, Spain has it’s rather pricey producers too. Vega Scilia, Palacios, Pingus to name of a few that sell for far north of 200$ at times.

    I personally, do not drink wine every day, or even every week but I do hit up a few of the tasting circles and I must say, you are missing out on a whole world of wines that could potentially “wow” you.

    I would never advocate to anyone that they should only drink XX$+ bottles, but to say I would never try a wine because it’s over XX$ I feel is just too restrictive.

    You’re right on one thing and that there is indeed a whole world of wine out there, only it’s not all below the 20$ mark =).

    As with your point of discussion with the elevation, acidity, brix what not, it really depends on the wine nerds you’re drinking with =)

    btw, the wine that first “wowed” me was a 100$ 01 Cakebread Vinehill reserve. I was a believer after then, that some wines can indeed be better than just good and I wouldn’t blink at trading in a case of good 10-15$ wine for a single bottle of that.

  • Zino

    Murso

    That’s cool. I’m not offended. I’ve enjoyed the discussion. I’m all for small producers who make wines that not only take advantage of nature, but also express their own creativity. These are always the wines with the most character and when they are on song there are none better. But I would always be wary of paying high prices for a new wine from such young vines. Having said that, the next time I’m in the US I will seek out a Match wine. Randy Sloan seems like a great and genuine guy and I’ll check out his the website.

    Zino

  • Zino

    Murso

    That’s cool. I’m not offended. I’ve enjoyed the discussion. I’m all for small producers who make wines that not only take advantage of nature, but also express their own creativity. These are always the wines with the most character and when they are on song there are none better. But I would always be wary of paying high prices for a new wine from such young vines. Having said that, the next time I’m in the US I will seek out a Match wine. Randy Sloan seems like a great and genuine guy and I’ll check out his the website.

    Zino

  • Jayhitek

    QOTD: Panaroz

  • Jayhitek

    QOTD: Panaroz

  • Jeff

    oscar falcón lara:

    A wine that’s represented by the monastrell grape is not the same as one represented by the cabernet sauvignon grape. While I am a huge fan of the jumilla valley in spain. You would be comparing apples to oranges here.

  • Jeff

    oscar falcón lara:

    A wine that’s represented by the monastrell grape is not the same as one represented by the cabernet sauvignon grape. While I am a huge fan of the jumilla valley in spain. You would be comparing apples to oranges here.

  • http://lleichtman.org/ Lawrence Leichtman

    So many that I can’t even come up with an answer as I have bought a dozen that I liked from all over Spain. I think the $70 price point is not too much for the Napa Cab market but I have never had any of the Baconbrook wines yet. I will.

  • http://lleichtman.org Lawrence Leichtman

    So many that I can’t even come up with an answer as I have bought a dozen that I liked from all over Spain. I think the $70 price point is not too much for the Napa Cab market but I have never had any of the Baconbrook wines yet. I will.

  • http://jeremyross.org/ Jeremy Ross

    I do love me a good Napa cab. But for my palette and wallet, they cost 2-4X more than they’re worth. Good thing Napa has such a strong brand, cuz so many areas of the world are killing Napa wrt value.

  • http://jeremyross.org Jeremy Ross

    I do love me a good Napa cab. But for my palette and wallet, they cost 2-4X more than they’re worth. Good thing Napa has such a strong brand, cuz so many areas of the world are killing Napa wrt value.

  • Carlitos

    QOTD. The ’06 Montroig Xarel-lo.

  • Carlitos

    QOTD. The ’06 Montroig Xarel-lo.

  • Dan-o

    Good show – enjoyed the guest.
    QOTD – I really can’t remember, but go with Albarino!

  • Dan-o

    Good show – enjoyed the guest.
    QOTD – I really can’t remember, but go with Albarino!

  • Dessert Wine Nerd

    My hands are amazing! Great episode. I had a dream about this episode a week before I watched it. It was a good day to die. I’ll have to see if some of these wines are available in my local shop. They seem interesting but im still on the hat about a $70 tag or so. QOTD: I couldnt tell you if you tied me down and tossed necks on me.

  • Dessert Wine Nerd

    My hands are amazing! Great episode. I had a dream about this episode a week before I watched it. It was a good day to die. I’ll have to see if some of these wines are available in my local shop. They seem interesting but im still on the hat about a $70 tag or so. QOTD: I couldnt tell you if you tied me down and tossed necks on me.

  • RD

    Titus Titus Titus for Napa Valley Value…incredible

  • RD

    Titus Titus Titus for Napa Valley Value…incredible

  • yowens

    Cool show but crazy expensive bottle- too rich for me. QOTD: I have to pass out of ignorance.

  • yowens

    Cool show but crazy expensive bottle- too rich for me. QOTD: I have to pass out of ignorance.

  • RDHudak

    Holy smokes Gary. It was distracting how many times you interrupted him. Still, a good episode.

  • John__J

    qotd: check episode 639

    Great guest and episode

  • Anonymous

    Love Match wines, have a 2003 and 2003 Butterdragon in cellar.. QOTD-Emilio Moro http://www.winelx.com

  • Anonymous

    What is it with all these bulls**ters who say they watch the show and don’t know about the question of the day?

  • Anonymous

    What is it with all these bulls**ters who say they watch the show and don’t know about the question of the day?

  • DrewM

    Had the ’05 a few weeks ago and LOVED it. Totally agree with Gary’s Paulliac comparison for the ’05. Going to buy more of this from Randy and try the other vintages.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=630276710 Luca Bercelli

    90/100

    line of the day – about the Vaynerchuks ‘up to 4th grade we dominate (sports) because of knowledge of the game, but after that it gets hairy because everybody else gets bigger’

    Liked the guest despite his annoying voice and the fact that he was unaware of the QOTD tradition (ie he doesn’t watch the show). Gary liked him and that’s good enough for me.

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