EP 912 Victory Brewing Tasting- Part II

Gary Vaynerchuk concludes the tasting with Bill Covaleski from Victory Brewing and talks more about the beer world.

Beers tasted in this episode:

Pilsner Urquell
Prima Pils
Oktoberfest Marzen
Victory Festbier


Latest Comment:

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luca bercelli

93/100

Line of the day ‘you Laker fans are full of crap’

Great episode

Tags: beer, review, Video

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  • Victorybeer Bill

    CV,
    I greatly appreciate your response to the QOTD. Your insight is fabulous.
    Interestingly, you point out a main difference in wine and beer and how that difference relates to the old world/new world dynamic in beer is interesting. Here is what I observe, assisted by your input:
    1. beer is constructed of more ingredients than wine and so does not always reflect pure terroir as wine does
    2. therefore, you are correct in citing structure and ‘rules’ as being important to assessment of a wine’s actual value against it’s peers
    3. ‘rules’ such as the Reinheitsgebot and Biersteuergesetz (in Germany) regulate and assure quality on the positive side, but constrain innovation on the negative side
    4. American craft brewers like Ron and I who trained in Germany, recognize the lack of these constraints and conventions in brewing in US and we seize that opportunity to envision new brews and flavors, often inspired by traditional European models
    5. this kind of ‘knife fight’ in brewing is acceptable in the US at this point in time because, post Prohibition, America’s historic beer styles were insipidized down to fizzy, yellow stuff entirely, by the ’80s
    6. both wine and beer need to remain cognizant of their traditional style origins to remain vital and relevant to an audience that also knows and respects past achievements
    All of this thinking is making me thirsty. Cheers, – Bill

  • Victorybeer Bill

    CV,
    I greatly appreciate your response to the QOTD. Your insight is fabulous.
    Interestingly, you point out a main difference in wine and beer and how that difference relates to the old world/new world dynamic in beer is interesting. Here is what I observe, assisted by your input:
    1. beer is constructed of more ingredients than wine and so does not always reflect pure terroir as wine does
    2. therefore, you are correct in citing structure and ‘rules’ as being important to assessment of a wine’s actual value against it’s peers
    3. ‘rules’ such as the Reinheitsgebot and Biersteuergesetz (in Germany) regulate and assure quality on the positive side, but constrain innovation on the negative side
    4. American craft brewers like Ron and I who trained in Germany, recognize the lack of these constraints and conventions in brewing in US and we seize that opportunity to envision new brews and flavors, often inspired by traditional European models
    5. this kind of ‘knife fight’ in brewing is acceptable in the US at this point in time because, post Prohibition, America’s historic beer styles were insipidized down to fizzy, yellow stuff entirely, by the ’80s
    6. both wine and beer need to remain cognizant of their traditional style origins to remain vital and relevant to an audience that also knows and respects past achievements
    All of this thinking is making me thirsty. Cheers, – Bill

  • Anonymous

    This was a great two part episode. What I enjoyed were the stories and his ability to describe the process and history.

    Best of luck and are y’all available in Texas?

    QOTD – I have not enjoyed many of the the better beers available but will be trying some soon.

  • YNWA.CPH.DK

    Thank you, thank you, thank you both for such insight into both beer and business.
    QOTD: I would think that American beer is way ahead of where American wine was in the early eighties. I’m from Denmark (=Carlsberg), and I feel that the micro trend from the States in the nineties woke up Danish and European breweries. Definitely Carlsberg got a wake up call, and are now making some interesting stuff. I would say US beer is where Cali Cabs where in the mid-late nineties. They were smoking hot and for wine nerds then much more interesting than Bordeaux. However, suddenly palates shift, and people have overdosed on the high octane stuff, and need to turn down the volume (sorry for all the metaphors), and perhaps get more food friendly. That might be why GV is at first experiencing your beers as more tasty, as he did with Cali Cabs back then. His beer palate is simply not mature yet?! As Bill says the European beers have had hundreds of years to find their formula – there might be an evolutionary reason as to why they’re not as full bodied.
    Having said that I think 75% of all beer innovation is comming from the US, and it will, and is making ‘old world’ beer move up a step, as ‘old world’ wine has had to do too in past last two decades.
    By the way, I have no clue what I’m talking about really, so if there are any beer experts out there please shut me up!
    SKÅL as we say in DK.

  • Great episode. Bill, your beer is phenomenal and so is your brewpub. If anyone is ever traveling to/through Downington, PA, it is well worth a visit.

    QOTD: I think the key issue when comparing the potential for premium wine and craft beer is how each is put on the liquor store shelf. Historically beer has been all about the brands and wine has been about the styles. When all the beer basically tastes the same (Bud, Miller, Coors, etc), all they have is their brand. But, it’s hard for consumers to sort out the world of craft beer when there are so many different brands and the styles aren’t well defined or well known. Would the average consumer even know that FestBier and Paulaner Oktoberfest are the same style? Probably not. For wine, the styles have been much more developed/defined and the brands take second fiddle. I know I like Riesling, let me look for a $10 bottle, and be done with it. The unfortunate reality is that in order for craft beer to really move beyond a niche, the brands will have to become less important and the styles will need to dictate how consumers make their choices. What if a liquor store were to organize its craft beer assortment by style and not by brand? (Gary, I’m looking at you). It would be much easier for consumers to figure out what a style means, which styles they like, and experiment from there.

  • Bill Covaleski has to be one of the coolest guests in WLTV, and one cool dude as well. Unfortunately I haven’t had any of his beers, an oversight I will have to correct soon.

    QOTD: I have not yet had enough USA Craft Beers to make an educated comment, but I like craft beers from all over.

  • Anonymous

    Great two-parter with a downright cool dude. GV- you got some Victory beer drinking to do if you plan to look even CLOSE to how young Bill looks when you’re 47…ha!

    QOTD: This is definitely the day of exponential growth and appreciation for US craft brewing, and with the afford-ability of these beverages in comparison to similar quality wine made in the states, these tougher economic times may even be helping sales and increased brand recognition with these breweries. Cheers, and best of luck with this steadily growing business!

  • Anonymous

    Nice to see quality beer get the love too.
    Wow! Gary did NOT spit anything. Maybe that’s why was having such a good time ; )

    QOTD: It think it really depends on where you live. Locally (SF area) our beer culture is fairly well-established, but Oakland is seeing some new action.
    I also agree that the national beer culture is probably a bit more advanced than wine was in the mid-70’s because of the accessibility of beer’s price point compared to higher-end wines. I LOVE wine, but I’m occasionally more likely to drop $5-8 on a Smoked beer from Germany or a 6-pack of Red Tail than a $30-40+ bottle of just about anything.

  • Anonymous

    Nice to see quality beer get the love too.
    Wow! Gary did NOT spit anything. Maybe that’s why was having such a good time ; )

    QOTD: It think it really depends on where you live. Locally (SF area) our beer culture is fairly well-established, but Oakland is seeing some new action.
    I also agree that the national beer culture is probably a bit more advanced than wine was in the mid-70’s because of the accessibility of beer’s price point compared to higher-end wines. I LOVE wine, but I’m occasionally more likely to drop $5-8 on a Smoked beer from Germany or a 6-pack of Red Tail than a $30-40+ bottle of just about anything.

  • RobinC

    The question reminds me of a recurring nightmare I used to have when I was in school of opening my Blue book and having to answer a question about which I knew absolutely nothing. Very panicky feeling. I don’t know anything more about beer than I get from taking sips of other peoples’ beer. That thing with the peanuts was amazing though.

  • RobinC

    The question reminds me of a recurring nightmare I used to have when I was in school of opening my Blue book and having to answer a question about which I knew absolutely nothing. Very panicky feeling. I don’t know anything more about beer than I get from taking sips of other peoples’ beer. That thing with the peanuts was amazing though.

  • I love Festbier we always get a growler filled of it when we go to Victory. Also get a growler of Lager its almost time for another trip!

  • I love Festbier we always get a growler filled of it when we go to Victory. Also get a growler of Lager its almost time for another trip!

  • Another great guest! I’ve only had the Victory Hop Devil so I’ll have to try some of the other Victory brews, especially the Prima since Pilsner Urquell used to be one of my favorites for pilsner. I’ve also had the St. Bernardus, and yeah, it is fantastic. QOTD: I do think so, but that’s both good and bad. The same with American wines, American craft brews seem to be getting a little *too* far from their roots in some respects. Too big, too bold, extra high gravity and IBUs off the charts (which I like in small doses don’t get me wrong), so a lot like the California wines of the 90’s. Just bringing too much to the table, too over the top, instead of focusing on quality ingredients and careful process, which is what started the micro/craft-brew movement in the U.S. I’ll name a beer: North Coast Red Seal. I absolutely LOVE this beer. It’s an amber ale, with no above average alcohol (5.5%) or bitterness (42 IBU, OK, that’s pushing it a bit…), but it has such great flavor and balance and aroma, I keep coming back to it above all of the other craft ales I’ve tried because it’s just…delicious and drinkable. AND, it’s uniquely American. I doubt you will find anything like it anywhere else in the world.

  • Another great guest! I’ve only had the Victory Hop Devil so I’ll have to try some of the other Victory brews, especially the Prima since Pilsner Urquell used to be one of my favorites for pilsner. I’ve also had the St. Bernardus, and yeah, it is fantastic. QOTD: I do think so, but that’s both good and bad. The same with American wines, American craft brews seem to be getting a little *too* far from their roots in some respects. Too big, too bold, extra high gravity and IBUs off the charts (which I like in small doses don’t get me wrong), so a lot like the California wines of the 90’s. Just bringing too much to the table, too over the top, instead of focusing on quality ingredients and careful process, which is what started the micro/craft-brew movement in the U.S. I’ll name a beer: North Coast Red Seal. I absolutely LOVE this beer. It’s an amber ale, with no above average alcohol (5.5%) or bitterness (42 IBU, OK, that’s pushing it a bit…), but it has such great flavor and balance and aroma, I keep coming back to it above all of the other craft ales I’ve tried because it’s just…delicious and drinkable. AND, it’s uniquely American. I doubt you will find anything like it anywhere else in the world.

  • Another great guest! I’ve only had the Victory Hop Devil so I’ll have to try some of the other Victory brews, especially the Prima since Pilsner Urquell used to be one of my favorites for pilsner. I’ve also had the St. Bernardus, and yeah, it is fantastic. QOTD: I do think so, but that’s both good and bad. The same with American wines, American craft brews seem to be getting a little *too* far from their roots in some respects. Too big, too bold, extra high gravity and IBUs off the charts (which I like in small doses don’t get me wrong), so a lot like the California wines of the 90’s. Just bringing too much to the table, too over the top, instead of focusing on quality ingredients and careful process, which is what started the micro/craft-brew movement in the U.S. I’ll name a beer: North Coast Red Seal. I absolutely LOVE this beer. It’s an amber ale, with no above average alcohol (5.5%) or bitterness (42 IBU, OK, that’s pushing it a bit…), but it has such great flavor and balance and aroma, I keep coming back to it above all of the other craft ales I’ve tried because it’s just…delicious and drinkable. AND, it’s uniquely American. I doubt you will find anything like it anywhere else in the world.

  • I think you’re right on track, kind of a corollary to what I just posted, though I would have to say that I don’t think Victory brews are quite the analogy to 90’s Cali Cabs that some other micro brews are. Bill seemed to have his feet firmly planted on the ground, and while I’ve only had one of his beers, it was not the kind of over the top beer I’ve had from others. But well said! SKOL (as we have to spell it in the U.S. when we don’t know how to use an international keyboard 🙂 )

  • I think you’re right on track, kind of a corollary to what I just posted, though I would have to say that I don’t think Victory brews are quite the analogy to 90’s Cali Cabs that some other micro brews are. Bill seemed to have his feet firmly planted on the ground, and while I’ve only had one of his beers, it was not the kind of over the top beer I’ve had from others. But well said! SKOL (as we have to spell it in the U.S. when we don’t know how to use an international keyboard 🙂 )

  • I think you’re right on track, kind of a corollary to what I just posted, though I would have to say that I don’t think Victory brews are quite the analogy to 90’s Cali Cabs that some other micro brews are. Bill seemed to have his feet firmly planted on the ground, and while I’ve only had one of his beers, it was not the kind of over the top beer I’ve had from others. But well said! SKOL (as we have to spell it in the U.S. when we don’t know how to use an international keyboard 🙂 )

  • Houston here, I know the Hop Devil is available, can’t recall seeing the ones on this show, but I’m gonna be looking!

  • Houston here, I know the Hop Devil is available, can’t recall seeing the ones on this show, but I’m gonna be looking!

  • Houston here, I know the Hop Devil is available, can’t recall seeing the ones on this show, but I’m gonna be looking!

  • Anonymous

    Good show guys. I really enjoyed getting all that info. I’ll have to try some victory beers next time i go to flying saucer in fort worth.
    Qotd: I definitely think that american craft beers are on that same kind of increase in popularity the american wines had in the 70’s. and i feel like more and more guys are actually looking for that quality in beer these days which makes me glad to grow up right now. i love any drink that tastes good: beer, wine, tea, saki, whiskey, tequila, gin, mixed drinks, coffee, etc. so the more drinks that i can talk about that kind stuff with the average joe type person; the happier i’ll be. and at the ripe young age of 24 i’ll actually have a good portion of my life left to truly enjoy and spend money on it to get the complete experience eventually.

  • Anonymous

    Good show guys. I really enjoyed getting all that info. I’ll have to try some victory beers next time i go to flying saucer in fort worth.
    Qotd: I definitely think that american craft beers are on that same kind of increase in popularity the american wines had in the 70’s. and i feel like more and more guys are actually looking for that quality in beer these days which makes me glad to grow up right now. i love any drink that tastes good: beer, wine, tea, saki, whiskey, tequila, gin, mixed drinks, coffee, etc. so the more drinks that i can talk about that kind stuff with the average joe type person; the happier i’ll be. and at the ripe young age of 24 i’ll actually have a good portion of my life left to truly enjoy and spend money on it to get the complete experience eventually.

  • Anonymous

    Good show guys. I really enjoyed getting all that info. I’ll have to try some victory beers next time i go to flying saucer in fort worth.
    Qotd: I definitely think that american craft beers are on that same kind of increase in popularity the american wines had in the 70’s. and i feel like more and more guys are actually looking for that quality in beer these days which makes me glad to grow up right now. i love any drink that tastes good: beer, wine, tea, saki, whiskey, tequila, gin, mixed drinks, coffee, etc. so the more drinks that i can talk about that kind stuff with the average joe type person; the happier i’ll be. and at the ripe young age of 24 i’ll actually have a good portion of my life left to truly enjoy and spend money on it to get the complete experience eventually.

  • Jbeisenhuth

    Amazing Episode!

  • Jbeisenhuth

    Amazing Episode!

  • Jbeisenhuth

    Amazing Episode!

  • Jbeisenhuth

    Amazing Episode!

  • Jbeisenhuth

    Amazing Episode!

  • Anonymous

    Great 2 part show.. very informative. Never even heard of Victory beer before – probably because it’s not in the UK – but would be keen to try some.

    QOTD – hard to comment as I’m not in the US.. but there doesn’t seem to be much of the ‘craft’ beer culture here as there is already so many great beers and ales in Europe. I generally think of American beer as tasteless (Bud, Miller etc), but I’ve now found there is more than just those mass-produced lagers. I still think America is way behind Europe for beer though – it’s hard to beat German weissbiers and British real ales.

  • John__J

    qotd: I can see that

  • John__J

    qotd: I can see that

  • Anonymous

    I need to go to the store and pick up some Victory beer today. We have a pretty good selection of their beers in Atlanta. I would enjoy meeting more brewery owners and brew masters on WLTV. I also liked the mention of Navarro, which is my favorite winery. I had one of their gewurztraminers this week and it was excellent. QOTD – I think the craft beer industry is where the wine industry was when I started drinking wine (early 80’s). Maybe it will grow as fast. Thanks for the interesting shows.

  • Anonymous

    I need to go to the store and pick up some Victory beer today. We have a pretty good selection of their beers in Atlanta. I would enjoy meeting more brewery owners and brew masters on WLTV. I also liked the mention of Navarro, which is my favorite winery. I had one of their gewurztraminers this week and it was excellent. QOTD – I think the craft beer industry is where the wine industry was when I started drinking wine (early 80’s). Maybe it will grow as fast. Thanks for the interesting shows.

  • Anonymous

    GV and Guest – Great show, love all the knowledge! Did sort of hope we could have gotten a better idea of what Bill geeks out on, but I get it! Huge craft beer fan and a really like Victory, although I’ve only had the Hop Devil IPA. Fret now, I will explore!

    QOTD: I think it is…I think people are a lot more open minded today and that really allows new flavors, styles, etc into the lives of beer drinkers and with that we all find a lot of new things we enjoy!

  • Anonymous

    GV and Guest – Great show, love all the knowledge! Did sort of hope we could have gotten a better idea of what Bill geeks out on, but I get it! Huge craft beer fan and a really like Victory, although I’ve only had the Hop Devil IPA. Fret now, I will explore!

    QOTD: I think it is…I think people are a lot more open minded today and that really allows new flavors, styles, etc into the lives of beer drinkers and with that we all find a lot of new things we enjoy!

  • Anonymous

    GV and Guest – Great show, love all the knowledge! Did sort of hope we could have gotten a better idea of what Bill geeks out on, but I get it! Huge craft beer fan and a really like Victory, although I’ve only had the Hop Devil IPA. Fret now, I will explore!

    QOTD: I think it is…I think people are a lot more open minded today and that really allows new flavors, styles, etc into the lives of beer drinkers and with that we all find a lot of new things we enjoy!

  • QOTD – I’d say that American craft breweries are currently beyond the level of American wines in that time period. I don’t think it’s gotten much beyond the US, but here in the midwest, I’m seeing a huge interest in craft brewing, even in this po-dunk town of mine.

  • QOTD – I’d say that American craft breweries are currently beyond the level of American wines in that time period. I don’t think it’s gotten much beyond the US, but here in the midwest, I’m seeing a huge interest in craft brewing, even in this po-dunk town of mine.

  • QOTD – I’d say that American craft breweries are currently beyond the level of American wines in that time period. I don’t think it’s gotten much beyond the US, but here in the midwest, I’m seeing a huge interest in craft brewing, even in this po-dunk town of mine.

  • I will now pick up some Victory beer. Is it available in Texas?

  • I will now pick up some Victory beer. Is it available in Texas?

  • I will now pick up some Victory beer. Is it available in Texas?

  • I will now pick up some Victory beer. Is it available in Texas?

  • I will now pick up some Victory beer. Is it available in Texas?

  • Anonymous

    QOTD: It’s at least at the level of wine was in that period, if not more.

    Best Beer Show ever! I usually tune out a bit when it’s a beer episode, but this was very knowledgable, and entertaining. You should invite Bill back again next year.

  • Anonymous

    Victory Beer is the real deal! I have drank a lot of very expensive import beer and this brewery holds its own against any and all of them. Every variety they produce has been well thought out and produced. If you can find it, try the V-Twelve. This is fantastic stuff, but watch out it is 12% alcohol and sneaks-up on you.

  • Anonymous

    Victory Beer is the real deal! I have drank a lot of very expensive import beer and this brewery holds its own against any and all of them. Every variety they produce has been well thought out and produced. If you can find it, try the V-Twelve. This is fantastic stuff, but watch out it is 12% alcohol and sneaks-up on you.

  • Anonymous

    Victory Beer is the real deal! I have drank a lot of very expensive import beer and this brewery holds its own against any and all of them. Every variety they produce has been well thought out and produced. If you can find it, try the V-Twelve. This is fantastic stuff, but watch out it is 12% alcohol and sneaks-up on you.

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